Yoga Classes

Yoga Classes

Yoga Studios conveniently located at

Paya Lebar

Smith Street 

Read More
Yoga Teacher Training

Yoga Teacher Training

Buddy Promo at $3600 for 2 pax ($1800 per pax only!)

Read More
Franchise Opportunities

Franchise Opportunities

Join us to be part of the most authentic yoga community

Read More

Types of Classes

Beginners yoga classes

Beginners

Learn proper breathing techniques, yoga warm ups, alignment of yoga poses. Great for beginners in Yoga! Take your first steps now.

Yoga core class

Yoga Core

Core refers to the deep muscles right towards the center of our body. Abs, back muscles etc are targeted to bring awareness to their contraction and also to strengthen them. When core muscles are strong, they can help us to improve our posture and balance.

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga is for balancing our sun and moon in our bodily system, which is very good for health. Level 1: Beginners to Intermediate Level 2: Intermediate to advanced

Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga

Ashtanga (Vinyasa) Yoga is a dynamic and physically challenging sequence, integrating breath and movement. It can help to improve the endurance, flexibility, strength and is a great calorie burning workout as well as mental focus. All in one class. The whole practice is done by flowing continuously, which is also the traditional roots of the modern Flow style. Ashtanga Vinyasa (1 hr 15 min) This asana practice comprises the classical form of Vinyasa yoga as taught in its traditional sequence, called the Ashtanga Vinyasa Primary Series.  You’ll be guided through the practice in a manageable way to suit beginners. By following a structured sequence, students will learn to internalise physical aspects and thus develop mindfulness of their breath, prana (internal energy) and drishti (focused gaze). Ashtanga Basics (1 hr) This class is also suitable for Beginners who wants to learn the Ashtanga Style of Yoga practice. Slowly and progressively, students will be taught the poses in the Ashtanga Primary Series, which helps to increase flexibility, endurance and balance.

Flow Yoga

Flow

A fun way to energise yourself with dynamic flow sequence, which incorporates yoga postures and sun salutations to break a sweat! Multi-level class.

meditation Yoga

Meditation

Meditation can improve your life. It can reduce stress, prevents anxiety and balances your hormonal system. It may be difficult at first, but when you overcome the difficulties, bliss and joy comes.

Class Packages

Pricing for Yoga Classes in Singapore. No sign up fees. Or single class at $25. ($35 from 1 Sep 2019 onwards)

Intro Package

$ 30
(per class)
  • 3 Classes at $90
  • Valid for 4 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Starter Package

$ 17
(per class)
  • 10 Classes at $170
  • Valid for 10 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Popular Package

$ 15
(per class)
  • 20 Classes at $300
  • Valid for 20 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Wow Package

$ 14
(per class)
  • 30 Classes at $420
  • Valid for 30 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Loyalty Package

$ 13
(per class)
  • 50 Classes at $650
  • Valid for 1 year (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Our Teachers

Tirisula team of dedicated Master Trainers and we have a pool of over 20 Yoga teachers

Master Paalu

Master Paalu

Yoga Master Trainer

Simple actions, huge impact

Master Sree

Yoga Master Trainer

Beyond religion and beliefs

Andrea McKenna

Andrea McKenna

Prenatal and Children's Yoga Trainer, Sound Healer

Fun all around

Yoga Articles

Our Tirisula Yoga collection of Yoga articles from Yoga teachers, students from all over the world. Read about Yoga poses, chakras, meditation, anatomy, injuries prevention and much more

How Yoga impacts my life

Chasing numbers and meeting sales target has been quite hectic for me these 10 years. I started to consume caffeine at least twice a day in order to stimulate my mind and body to keep awake. To increase my appetite and relax, I always eat spicy, sour and generally strong-flavoured foods which is referred to as a Rajasic diet. After understanding more about the 3 Gunas and food, I have started to think twice when I am ordering food these days and I have also managed to cut down on my caffeine intake. I am definitely becoming more conscious about where the food on my plate comes from and how the food is being prepared. I also try to wake up earlier to prepare a simple breakfast for my family and myself.

To me, my passion for Yoga not only stems from being able to learn how to do all the beautiful poses, but also because I get to learn more about the Yoga Philosophy. I feel that it shapes me into a better version of myself as I am constantly reflecting, looking and analysing things from different perspectives. I have become more mindful and observant about the little things happening in my surroundings. Yoga philosophy is profound. I am curious to learn and dig out more. I can’t wait to share more with family, friends!

On the Way from Svādhyāya to Ahimsa—Part 2: A random walk takes longer

[The first part of the post is here.]

So we’re on the way from here to Nirvana. Practicing Svādhyāya, we study ourselves to find out where we’re on our way. We walk a little and then stop and study where we are, how it looks like there, how it feels like there. And then we decide on the next direction and go a few steps farther. Our walk is not very straightforward. Because we don’t know the right direction. Because we don’t have a map. If we had a map, we could be much faster on our way to Nirvana… No, there is no map. Just a small road sign here and there if we look properly. But no map. We need to find our way to Nirvana by ourselves…

Let’s go back to the labels. We study ourselves and give labels. To us and to others. Good labels and bad labels, and labels of all shades in between. Marshall Rosenberg, a peacemaker and the author of Nonviolent Communication, calls these labels a violent language, or Jackal language. He sees them as the origin of violence. The Jackal in us is excellent at giving labels. Excellent at telling what’s good and wrong about us and others. And excellent at diagnosing why it is so (e.g., because you’re like your mother). Even the positive labels are violent. They are a form of manipulation, believing that having nice labels will win us the love of others. There is a beautiful video on Youtube worth watching.

In this video, Marshall Rosenberg also says that to resolve any conflict he needed less than 20 minutes from the point in which both parties understood what their own needs and the needs of the other conflict party had been. Even conflicts lasting long years. Even conflicts which had cost many lives.

The thing is that it can take hours or even days to get to the point of understanding of the needs. There is another, 8 hours long, video from another Marshall Rosenberg’s workshop which beautifully demonstrates how difficult it is even for intelligent and eager people to dig deep enough to understand their needs, or even to distinguish what a need is and what not.

The first videos was a small road sign on my Svādhyāya path.

Understanding our own needs goes much deeper and farther than the shallow labels. Understanding of our needs is the hard part of Svādhyāya. But it’s the part which dispels violence. Violence against our selves and violence against others.

Ahimsa is the first yama and means nonviolence or non-harming.
… “suddenly love arises from the abandonment of violence”.

Namaskar

 

Just breathe

As a quiet observer in the office elevator this morning, I watched as this tall man breathed heavily, breaking the stillness with his audible inhalations and exhalations. Before I could think “oh awkward, does he know how loud he actually is”, I interrupted my own thoughts and wondered if perhaps being able to hear another person’s breathing should be considered normal.

How many of us suffer from shallow breathing?

Are we aware of the way we suppress our inhales and exhales to avoid emitting too much noise as it is “inappropriate”? Or by practising the “sucked-in belly” so as not to show our bulging tummies? Add to that stress and long hours hunching over a desk or electronic device, what happens? We become shallow chest or thoracic breathers.

When we breathe in a shallow way, the body remains in a cyclical state of stress—our stress causing shallow breathing and our shallow breathing causing stress.

Source: https://www.headspace.com/blog/2017/08/15/shallow-breathing-whole-body/

By contrast during yoga classes, we are encouraged to breeeeathe (teacher goes “I can’t hear your breathing!”) and not hold your breath even in uncomfortable poses.

I never really appreciated the breathing cues during yoga classes until I attempted to practise Surya Namaskar together with the corresponding inhales and exhales. What started as a tedious memorization test slowly revealed itself as being quite logical once I’ve gotten used to it. We see this in a forward bend – you exhale, contracting the abdomen and hence making space for a deeper stretch. It also acts as a pacer for me in group classes as I try to align my breathing with someone of similar respiratory rhythm.

As we have learnt, breathing is both involuntary and voluntary but intentional deep breathing provides massive benefits to us physically and mentally. There is an extensive discussion available online with numerous studies on the advantages of pranayama but for now, I would just like to share 4 things I have started to do in my humble attempt to try to reap some of the benefits:

  1. During the morning commute to work, I spend a short 3-5 minutes just focusing on abdominal breathing, counting each inhalation and exhalation as I go along. In just a week, I have found myself being able to increase in the length of each breath and it feels good to start the day with a clear mind.
  2. I tend to tense up at work and often catch myself holding my breath or taking in little sips of air when I’m stressed. Being conscious of my breath throughout the day allows me to remind myself to breathe properly. Many of us also wear a smart watch/device set at hourly intervals to remind us to stand up or move around. Whenever I get such an alert on my watch, I take the opportunity to do a quick check on my breathing as well.
  3. For those who are sensitive to environmental allergens, I have found that Anulom Vilom can very quickly clear a stuffy nose. While it doesn’t provide an instant remedy for the tightened chest and constricted airways, Anulom Vilom does help to diminish the anxiety as the discomfort gradually fades away.
  4. Before bedtime, I wind down by doing several rounds of Anulom Vilom in the hope of a calm mind and a good night’s rest.

Back to my thought this morning, since societal norms dictate that breathing loudly can be rather awkward, one can be really discreet while practising Anulom Vilom as compared to the other types of pranayama (well, that is if you don’t have a blocked nostril!), so this is definitely my go-to. Try to incorporate this into your daily life!