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Suspension of Studio Yoga Classes

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Join us for a Yoga class at our boutique Yoga studios now

We offer Yoga classes from beginners to advanced levels, from relaxing to challenging classes. To learn Yoga in a more structured way, you can enrol in our Yoga Foundation Course or Yoga Teacher Training Certification programs.

Yoga Class Descriptions

Choose from the different varieties of Yoga styles to suit your Yoga practice

Beginners

Simple and easy to follow, great for starters

Yoga Core

Tone abs, trim the waistline and strengthen your core!

Ashtanga Yoga

Challenging movement oriented traditional sequence. Start with Ashtanga Basics, then progress to Ashtanga Primary Series for intermediate level

Hatha Yoga

A slower-paced class in which poses are held a little longer to give you the opportunity to express yourself fully.

Flow

Explore movements with breath and flow into yoga postures.

Yin Yoga

Passive floor poses that work the hips, pelvis, inner thighs, lower spine.

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Yoga Articles

Our Tirisula Yoga collection of Yoga articles from Yoga teachers, students from all over the world. Read about Yoga poses, chakras, meditation, anatomy, injuries prevention and much more

How pranayamas are changing my life

Since I am a kid, I hear my mother telling me to deeply inhale when I am hurt. I noticed it worked at the time, but honestly, until I started yoga, I can tell I have never known how to breath.

Pranayamas are such powerful exercices, I feel days after days the benefits of doing daily breathing exercices. They bring one into another frequency, that can open up opportunities, people, and somehow, more mindfulness.

The good thing about pranayamas is that you can do them everywhere; in the MRT, before sleeping or while walking or simply in between two meetings.

For me, its releasing the tension when I am stressed, the tummy pain (I’m expecting a baby and it’s quite frequent to have tension and cramps at the end of the day), or even the pain when I am doing a difficult asana.

While I believe I am doing pretty good and I am quite regular with pranayamas, it is not a sadana just yet, so the next steps for me is to block 15minutes to do my couple of asanas but, most of all, alternate breathing.

to be continued…

Eating Sattvic

We all know the theory…. “A sattvic diet is a regimen that places emphasis on seasonal foods, fruits if one has no sugar problems, dairy products if the cow is fed and milked in the right conditions, nuts, seeds, oils, ripe vegetables, legumes, whole grains, and non-meat based proteins.” source google

Since I learned about the three gunas in food, in every meal, I try to analyse whats sattvic about my food, whats rajasic, and what’s tamasic.

I am gourmet and I always love a great cheat meal, but, by categorizing what I eat with gunas, without feeling guilty, I have just stepped into more awareness. As I progress into my mindfulness journey, I can see I am integrating more and more sattvic foods, and I will try to change the cooking style (slightly cooked or steamed) or I will make sure I add elements that are sattvic.

Explanation; I am craving for a big pasta meal –

option 1 I’ll force myself to eat some salad first before getting to the main (pastas), this will ease my hunger and ensure my meal has a little bit of sattvic.   option 2 Ill make the sauce myself using fresh tomatoes and slightly cooked spinach, minimizing the oil.

My journey is there today and this meal isn’t going to be perfect, but days after days, I know it will get closer to the goal

 

How did yoga democratise itself and how it has become part of our daily life routine?

A few years back, Yoga was perceived like a weird spiritual related discipline that only hippies were into. So it got be questioning: how did Yoga become such a huge hype that today you cannot avoid traveling anywhere in the world without seeing a Yoga studio somewhere?

Yoga in sanskrit means “union” and a yogi will spend a lifetime trying to align body, mind and soul! 

Yoga originated over 5,000 years ago and at the time was a philosophical and meditative movement (amongst many others) trying to unite our physical world with the divine. 

The mental effort to unite body, mind and soul is much more difficult than only focusing on the physical postures. It is therefore thought that postures will only start appearing in Yoga in the 18th century and they could only start being practiced after long hours of meditation work first. Yoga has therefore evolved over the course of the years and History. The Yoga that we practice today has mostly been inspired by the 1920’s. 

The first guru to “promote” Yoga to the western world was Swami Vivekananda in Chicago in 1893 during the World’s Parliament of Religions. He gave a vision of Yoga to be a philosophical, spiritual, universal and tolerant discipline. 

In 1924, the guru Tirumalai Krishnamacharya developed a series of postures accessible to all, targeting the western world. This method which did not require intense meditation before starting any physical practice will democratize Yoga and become quite popular amongst westerners in search of spirituality and exotisme. 

In 1968, The Beatles go on a trip to Rishikesh, the city of their guru Maharishi Mahesh. Following their stay, Rishikesh will then become popular as a city of yoga and music and will attract a lot of people who want to visit the “Holy City of Yoga”. 

In 1973, the popular and controversial guru Bikram Choudhury started teaching Hollywood stars Yoga (Madonna, George Clooney, Demi Moore…). He will create his own hot yoga practice and will open hundreds of studios across the USA and abroad. 

In the 1980’s, as Yoga has become more and more “trendy” across the world, the attention sets back to its roots: India. Rishikesh becomes one of the official “yoga authentic” cities in the world. Many westerners who are into Yoga will make a stop over in the city. 

The various gurus who have helped Yoga become more trendy have also raised new questions amongst the practitioners: is yoga a practice of the body or the mind? 

Source: Marie Kock, « Yoga, une histoire-monde »