Yoga Classes

Yoga Classes

YOGA STUDIO @ PAYA LEBAR

NEW STUDIO @ SMITH STREET

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Yoga Teacher Training

Yoga Teacher Training

SINGAPORE . INDIA

A Registered Yoga School with World Yoga Alliance

ENROL IN YOGA TEACHER TRAINING COURSE NOW

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Franchise Opportunities

Franchise Opportunities

Join us to be part of the most authentic yoga community

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Practice is Progress. Choose your path

Grow with us from a student in Yoga Classes (Beginners to Advanced), to certified Yoga Teachers graduating from Yoga Certification Courses, to a business partner in owning a Tirisula franchise Yoga studio.

We believe in simplicity

The uniqueness of Tirisula Yoga Studios are:

Automated Booking

Manage classes online

Structured Classes

Learn Yoga in a structured way

Superb Teachers

Each teacher has their own uniqueness

Types of Classes

Select from the various classes to suit your goals and levels

Beginners yoga classes

Beginners

Learn proper breathing techniques, yoga warm ups, alignment of yoga poses. Great for beginners in Yoga! Take your first steps now.

Yoga core class

Yoga Core

Core refers to the deep muscles right towards the center of our body. Abs, back muscles etc are targeted to bring awareness to their contraction and also to strengthen them. When core muscles are strong, they can help us to improve our posture and balance.

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga is for balancing our sun and moon in our bodily system, which is very good for health. Level 1: Beginners to Intermediate Level 2: Intermediate to advanced

Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga

Ashtanga (Vinyasa) Yoga is a dynamic and physically challenging sequence, integrating breath and movement. It can help to improve the endurance, flexibility, strength and is a great calorie burning workout as well as mental focus. All in one class. The whole practice is done by flowing continuously, which is also the traditional roots of the modern Flow style. Ashtanga Primary Series (1 hr 15 min) This asana practice comprises the classical form of Vinyasa yoga as taught in its traditional sequence, called the Ashtanga Vinyasa Primary Series.  You’ll be guided through the practice in a manageable way to suit beginners. By following a structured sequence, students will learn to internalise physical aspects and thus develop mindfulness of their breath, prana (internal energy) and drishti (focused gaze). Ashtanga Basics (1 hr) This class is also suitable for Beginners who wants to learn the Ashtanga Style of Yoga practice. Slowly and progressively, students will be taught the poses in the Ashtanga Primary Series, which helps to increase flexibility, endurance and balance.

Flow Yoga

Flow

A fun way to energise yourself with dynamic flow sequence, which incorporates yoga postures and sun salutations to break a sweat! Multi-level class.

meditation Yoga

Meditation

Meditation can improve your life. It can reduce stress, prevents anxiety and balances your hormonal system. It may be difficult at first, but when you overcome the difficulties, bliss and joy comes.

Package Options

Pricing for Yoga Classes in Singapore. No sign up fees.

1 single class

$ 25
(per class)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • No cancellation
  • Some classes are at $30

Starter Package

$ 17
(per class)
  • 10 Classes at $170
  • Valid for 10 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Popular Package

$ 15
(per class)
  • 20 Classes at $300
  • Valid for 20 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Wow Package

$ 14
(per class)
  • 30 Classes at $420
  • Valid for 30 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

We believe in quality

Tirisula team of dedicated Master Trainers and we have a pool of over 20 Yoga teachers

Master Paalu

Master Paalu

Yoga Master Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Simple actions, huge impact

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Yoga & Pilates Teacher Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Unfold the truth, break all barriers

Max Sree

Max Sree

Yoga Master Trainer

Beyond religion and beliefs

Andrea McKenna

Andrea McKenna

Prenatal and Children's Yoga Trainer, Sound Healer

Fun all around

Yoga Articles

Our Tirisula Yoga collection of Yoga articles from Yoga teachers, students from all over the world. Read about Yoga poses, chakras, meditation, anatomy, injuries prevention and much more

Sankalpa

Sankalpa is a specific intention or goal, a one-pointed resolve as explained by Master Paalu. A sankalpa speaks to the larger arc of our lives, our dharma—our overriding purpose for being here. This topic got me thinking about my purpose in life – what I want to do, what my sankalpa is, no matter how small or big, to get to where I want to get to.

To live our soul’s mission, we need to reach milestones. Setting specific goals can help to connect our conscious choices with our unconscious. To do this, we can ask ourselves what things need to happen for us to progress on our path. Once we have realized this, we can then form a personal Sankalpa that describes what we need to do and inform our subconscious where we need to direct our energy to make progress on our goals.

Over time, our actions will start to align with our intentions, moving towards our goal or purpose. By formulating our Sankalpa and focusing on bringing it to fruition, one step at a time, we can reach our true Dharma, and realize our true potential.

What if we do not absolutely know what our true purpose is right now? I would think it does not really matter, because life is a base, and there is a lot of potential. It could go anywhere, but it could only go if the energy flows. The energy cannot be stuck in the mind and be stagnant; it must flow. We should simply start where we are – even a desire that might be interpreted as simple or shallow can lead us to the heart’s desire. It might arise out of conditioning, but if we trust the practice and keep following the heart’s desire, it will take us to the essence of our being.

The best thing to me about Sankalpa is that we can live it day by day – and we only ever get to live one moment at a time, NOW! Sankalpa can be used before meditation, yoga, before and after a nights sleep, basically when we are in a deeply relaxed state. By repeating it daily, we also allow it to become a part of our being.

I find applying the technique of Sankalpa to my asana practice deeply satisfying, and I liken this to setting an intention before my practice. When we begin to understand what we are seeking from our practice, we can see how to direct energies and actions in order to get there. It also allows us to stay focused during our practice. In acknowledgment of our blocks and weaknesses in certain asanas, recognizing that through every practice we are taking a small step forward towards a bigger goal, and remaining kind to ourselves in the process, we are propelled closer to our goal. Intentions and sankalpas aren’t uttered once and then forgotten about. In yoga, during challenging poses, we can call forth our intention and allow it to power us through the posture. Just like in yoga, a sankalpa can be applied to power you through the challenges of life.



Yoga Heals

Yoga is a way of life that seeks the union of mind and body, it is hence no wonder that it heals both the mind and body, an all encompassing that allows one to improve their physical body and mental health.

Yoga for the physical body. It’s no stranger that asanas helps one to train and strengthen their body. There are many ways that it does so.

Firstly, flexibility. Poses like the Padangusthasana lengthen and stretches out the hamstrings to enable a forward fold, the Kapotasana helps to stretch out your spine and open your chest, almost all asanas helps you stretch out one way or another. This helps you to keep your muscles strong, healthy so as to maintain your range of motion.

Next, strength, there are many ways asanas train your strength. Holding a downward dog for five breaths helps you improve your endurance, doing Chaturanga helps you to train your arm muscles, holding a Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana helps you train your stabilising muscles, there are endless ways yoga helps you to build up both your external and internal muscles.

In fact, not just the asanas are good for your physical health, other limbs of Yogi such as the Pranayamas help you to clean out your physical body as well. Breathing exercises such as Kapalabhati clear out your mucus and helps you feel refresh and ready to start the day, whereas Nadhi Shodhana helps to heat or cool your body down. Generally, benefits such as improved respiratory and cardiovascular systems are known to happen.

Yoga for the mental state. In addition to the physical changes that yoga brings about, there are also mental benefits that come with the Yogi.

In addition to helping to clear the body of toxins, Pranayamas also help to alert one’s mind, reduce stress and also focus better. By looking at the eight limbs of Yogi, it would allow one to undergo a mental revelation and helps to overhaul one’s state of mind. Even if disregarding the spiritual aspects of yoga, the Kriyas and Yoga Nidras help to refresh one’s mind!

There is no doubt that starting yoga would help you with both your physical and mental state, so what are you waiting for? Go join a class now!

Our 1st duty as parents – Living the 8 limbs of yoga


The 8 limbs of Ashtanga yoga/Raja yoga  provide a holistic methodology to systematically release the mind & thus live more enlightened, purposeful lives! (isn’t that what most of us want?)

The name “8 Limbs” comes from the Sanskrit term Ashtanga and refers to the eight limbs of yoga: Yama (attitudes toward our environment), Niyama (attitudes toward ourselves), Asana (physical postures), Pranayama (restraint or expansion of the breath), Pratyahara (withdrawal of the senses), Dharana (concentration), Dhyana (meditation) and Samadhi (complete integration). 

The above can be applied to all areas of our lives including parenting!

All around us, we see that Childrens yoga classes are taking off.  My 2yr old & 3 year old each have their own mat and block & delight getting into mountain, warrior, tree, and downward facing dog poses. Getting children actively involved in yoga from young is great for their bodies, their minds, and breathing!

But do we have to wait until children are standing on their 2 legs to start thinking about how yoga applies to/affects them? 

If you only think of yoga (as the modernised world so often does) as in just the physical, (asanas/poses), then you may say that your baby already started doing yoga whilst in Utero in Pindasana. (Side note: how cute are babies as they progress from svasanasa to dhanurasana and then to happy baby poses?)

When you step away from the physical, and implore the 8 limbs of yoga, you will realise that the consistent practice of this holistic approach benefits not only the practitioner, but their future offspring as well. In one of our lectures, M.Paalu mentioned that consistent pranayama & meditation practiced by parents even before conception, has a tremendously positive outcome on the children they bring into this world – it’s postive effects pass through not just the DNA, but through the energy exuded as well! When both mother and Father are aligned and centred in self, such an environment creates a conducive, healthy space to raise children.

I started thinking of my own pregnancies and pleasantly recalled some of the spiritual & positive daily habits I performed. Unfortunately, once the babies arrived my world turned crazy like it usually does for most mums during the first few years of child-rearing: my swadhyaya (reading/self study), focus (dharana) and meditation (dhyana) practice deteriorated.

It is only now that my kids are in school for half the day, that I finally have some

time for myself and am reintroducing reading, studying, pranayam & meditation back to my life. Although I feel the rustiness of my 37 year old brain and body, I am Glad that I have made the start & have action plans to get myself polished again. The 4 weeks of intense introspection during YTT allowed me to shine the torch inwards on myself (Niyamas). I am grateful to have done this course at the beginning of the year so that i can take forward the very many lessons & techniques learnt, (specifically Sankalpha,  one-pointed resolve to focus both psychologically and philosophically on a specific goal), and build on it  & remember 2019 as the year that Kas returned to the world after being stuck in the ‘mummy cave’ during the last 3.5years! 

There are 2 things we should give our children – one is roots and the other is wings” – Author unknown.

The 8 Limbs of Yoga provide a solid foundation that we can implement so that our children may experience and observe from our behaviours and actions. By introducing concentration games early on in childhood, we plant the seeds for them to focus and concentrate (Dharana) thereby creating their independence.

Life offers no greater responsibility, no greater privilege than the raising of the next generation” – C Everett Koop. We owe it to our children to be the best versions of ourselves; to live to our full potential; and to add (positively and purposefully) to this life that we have been given.