Everyone can Progress

Everyone can Progress

Walk the journey with us from beginner yoga students to teachers who inspire.

YOGA CLASSES

Read More
Learn from the most experienced Masters

Learn from the most experienced Masters

We are the most experienced Yoga School that has taught more than 5000 Yoga teachers worldwide. Learn from the best.

YOGA TEACHER TRAINING

Read More
Franchise Opportunities

Franchise Opportunities

You don’t have to leave your job to start a Yoga studio

Read More

Practice is Progress. Choose your path

Grow with us from a student in Yoga Classes (Beginners to Advanced), to certified Yoga Teachers graduating from Yoga Certification Courses, to a business partner in owning a Tirisula franchise Yoga studio.

We believe in simplicity

The uniqueness of Tirisula Yoga Studios are:

Automated Booking

Manage classes online

Structured Classes

Learn Yoga in a structured way

Superb Teachers

Each teacher has their own uniqueness

Types of Classes

Select from the various classes to suit your goals and levels

Beginners yoga classes

Beginners

Learn proper breathing techniques, yoga warm ups, alignment of yoga poses. Great for beginners in Yoga! Take your first steps now.

Yoga core class

Yoga Core

Core refers to the deep muscles right towards the center of our body. Abs, back muscles etc are targeted to bring awareness to their contraction and also to strengthen them. When core muscles are strong, they can help us to improve our posture and balance.

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga is for balancing our sun and moon in our bodily system, which is very good for health. Level 1: Beginners to Intermediate Level 2: Intermediate to advanced

Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga

Ashtanga (Vinyasa) Yoga is a dynamic and physically challenging sequence, integrating breath and movement. It can help to improve the endurance, flexibility, strength and is a great calorie burning workout as well as mental focus. All in one class. The whole practice is done by flowing continuously, which is also the traditional roots of the modern Flow style. Ashtanga Primary Series (1 hr 15 min) This asana practice comprises the classical form of Vinyasa yoga as taught in its traditional sequence, called the Ashtanga Vinyasa Primary Series.  You’ll be guided through the practice in a manageable way to suit beginners. By following a structured sequence, students will learn to internalise physical aspects and thus develop mindfulness of their breath, prana (internal energy) and drishti (focused gaze). Ashtanga Basics (1 hr) This class is also suitable for Beginners who wants to learn the Ashtanga Style of Yoga practice. Slowly and progressively, students will be taught the poses in the Ashtanga Primary Series, which helps to increase flexibility, endurance and balance.

Flow Yoga

Flow

A fun way to energise yourself with dynamic flow sequence, which incorporates yoga postures and sun salutations to break a sweat! Multi-level class.

meditation Yoga

Meditation

Meditation can improve your life. It can reduce stress, prevents anxiety and balances your hormonal system. It may be difficult at first, but when you overcome the difficulties, bliss and joy comes.

Package Options

Pricing for Yoga Classes in Singapore. No sign up fees. As simple as it gets.

1 single class

$ 23
(per class)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • No cancellation

Starter Package

$ 15
(per class)
  • 10 Classes at $150
  • Valid for 10 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Popular Package

$ 13
(per class)
  • 20 Classes at $260
  • Valid for 20 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Wow Package

$ 12
(per class)
  • 30 Classes at $360
  • Valid for 30 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

We believe in quality

Tirisula team of dedicated Masters and teachers

Master Paalu

Master Paalu

Yoga Master Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Simple actions, huge impact

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Yoga & Pilates Teacher Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Unfold the truth, break all barriers

Max Sree

Max Sree

Yoga Master Trainer

Beyond religion and beliefs

Heike Kasper

Heike Kasper

Yoga & Pilates Teacher Trainer

Andrea McKenna

Andrea McKenna

Prenatal and Children's Yoga Trainer, Sound Healer

Fun all around

Rachel T

Rachel T

Yoga Teacher

Enjoy the process

Leah Northington

Yoga Teacher

Integrating medicine and spirituality

Yoga Articles

Our Tirisula Yoga collection of Yoga articles from Yoga teachers, students from all over the world. Read about Yoga poses, chakras, meditation, anatomy, injuries prevention and much more

Yoga Lost in Translation

Like many arts and sciences that are compelling, beautiful, and deep, yoga has suffered from the spiritual starvation of the modern world. Over the years Yoga has been translated, modernised, westernised and watered down. In many countries the profound and eternal essence of yoga has been mainly misrepresented as a fitness culture or even promoting Hinduism. Unfortunately such a cloud of confusion has masked the true concept of yoga.

Yoga is a way of life, the uniting of the body, mind and spirit. Its real purpose is not just to become physically fit or mentally relaxed but also to deepen our own spiritual journey, enabling and guiding us to be more aware of ourselves, ultimately leading to self-realization. It is about making a connection with our world and having a clear mind that is free from delusion.

Patanjali, known as “the father of yoga”, said in a very simple way what he thought yoga is for him; “Yoga is the practice of quieting the mind”. To give meaning to those simple words, continuous practice and discipline are required to attain Yoga. Yoga means “union”, to unite mind, body and spirit. There are many descriptions long and short among books and websites on explaining the concept of yoga. However theorizing and describing yoga, would be just the same as trying to define love. During my first week in Tirisula’s YTTC Master Paalu asked the class “how do you know when you are in love?” and many of us were stummped in describing the full essence of love. Like Yoga the dictionary and books can define the term, but in order to truly understand we have to experience yoga by living the practice.

For me yoga provides me a safe space and an opportunity to connect with the inner silence and peace within. During asana practices it stretches and bend me in more ways than one, both physically and mentally. Yoga has taught me awareness, awareness of my body, mental state and my breath. It is about returning to my breath and realizing that I am blessed with everything that I have at this very moment. As Master Paalu said “ We are living in Heaven, what more do we want?”

Yoga – something for men?

If you go to any Yoga studio in Singapore, you will soon realize that most of the students are female. All the classes I ever took were overwhelmingly dominated by women and in the Yoga studio I frequent there are maybe – beside me – two or three other men, who use to come regularly (more than two times a week). Also while I was doing my YTT here at Tirisula Yoga I was the only participant out of a total of 13. If you look at the gender of the teachers – at least at my Yoga studio – a quite different picture shows itself. It is actually quite evenly distributed (with even a slight advantage for male teachers). So the reason why not more men are practicing Yoga is definitely not that they are physically not able to. Actually – historically speaking – Yoga used to be men-only until not so long ago.

 

When my family was moving to Singapore in early 2017 my mother was the only member of the family practicing Yoga. My father was joining her soon afterwards and a little later both of them were trying to persuade me to also join them. Their effort was not bearing fruits for nearly half a year. I didn’t want to do Yoga because I thought like a lot of other men that Yoga is something for women. My (naïve) idea of a typical Yoga class consisted at this time of a lot of meditation, simple stretches while chanting Om the whole time and then going back home. I think that this perception of Yoga is quite common among men. When I was finally convinced to try a Yoga class all of these ideas were disproved massively. My clothes were dripping wet and I felt muscles I didn’t even know existed days afterward. I soon realized that Yoga requires not only a great amount of flexibility but also to the same extent strength, discipline and stamina.

 

So the main reasons why the great majority of men are not practicing Yoga is that they have a totally screwed idea of what Yoga is. And the awesome pictures of super-flexible girls on Instagram don’t really help to change that. Yoga is generally linked by men to meditation, chanting and flexibility, but in reality it is so much more! Yes, there are classes which require a lot of flexibility, there are meditation classes, but there are also classes which are more strength based and there are definitely classes which you will finish wet from head to toes. Apart from that Yoga reduces stress, leads to a happier life and improves your posture. Also it cures back pain and an abnormal blood pressure, from which a lot of men are suffering from.

So in a nutshell Yoga is something for everyone regardless of gender!

 

Amon

Discussing “Pain” in the Singapore context [part 1]

DISCLAIMER:
This will be a pretty long anecdote/opinion piece so I have divided it into two parts for your benefit.

With longer working hours, the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle have been observed in the growing epidemic of chronic pain. Observe the working adults around you; you might see them involuntarily cracking their neck or unconsciously rubbing their shoulders in the hopes of temporarily relieving pain. Cases of chronic low back pain have also dramatically increased.

So why have we passively accepted and even accommodated this unwelcome presence of pain in our lives? From my own observations, pain (especially chronic pain) in Singapore has been perceived in the two extremes, however contradictory.

  1. Pain is a sign of hard work
  2. Pain is a sign of weakness

Let me explain myself. In Singapore, where most people are caught up in a rat race to be the best, the concept of “no pain, no gain” has become entrenched. It started off as an exercise motto that promises greater value rewards for the price of hard and even painful work but now it has been applied in all kinds of scenarios, including at our workplace and at school. In a way, that saying validates our competitiveness and justifies our long working hours. However, we have gone too far by glamorising that thinking. We have even begun to use pain to justify our hard work; for example, if you have muscle aches after a punishing workout, that is a good sign that you pushed yourself to the limit. If you have knots in your shoulders from working long hours on the computer, you are an excellent employee.

This is because we have been given the message that in order to succeed, we need punishing workouts, we need to work until we are completely exhausted, we need to work doubly hard to the next person. After all, pain is weakness leaving the body, right? No. In the short term, that might work, but it is damaging in the long run. It is not sustainable and the consequences have begun to show.

Speaking from personal experience, I have injured myself a few times because I subscribed to that belief. I was immersed in yoga for a few months and I feared that I would lose my hard-earned fitness if I took a day or two off. At the same time, I was balancing a time consuming part-time job and my first year of University. I was not getting enough sleep, not eating well enough and as a result, I was constantly exhausted. And in a flow class one day, I lost my focus for a moment and I hurt my wrist. For the next few months, I could not get myself into a proper chaturanga, plank poses and variations hurt greatly and I was forced to stop.

-> read part 2 for my revelations.