Yoga Classes

Yoga Classes

Yoga Studios conveniently located at

Paya Lebar

Smith Street 

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Yoga Teacher Training

Yoga Teacher Training

Learn the proper and authentic Yoga from experienced Yoga Masters

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Franchise Opportunities

Franchise Opportunities

Join us to be part of the most authentic yoga community

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Practice is Progress. Choose your path

Grow with us from a student in Yoga Classes (Beginners to Advanced), to certified Yoga Teachers graduating from Yoga Certification Courses, to a business partner in owning a Tirisula franchise Yoga studio.

We believe in simplicity

The uniqueness of Tirisula Yoga Studios are:

Automated Booking

Manage classes online

Structured Classes

Learn Yoga in a structured way

Superb Teachers

Each teacher has their own uniqueness

Types of Classes

Select from the various classes to suit your goals and levels

Beginners yoga classes

Beginners

Learn proper breathing techniques, yoga warm ups, alignment of yoga poses. Great for beginners in Yoga! Take your first steps now.

Yoga core class

Yoga Core

Core refers to the deep muscles right towards the center of our body. Abs, back muscles etc are targeted to bring awareness to their contraction and also to strengthen them. When core muscles are strong, they can help us to improve our posture and balance.

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga

Hatha Yoga is for balancing our sun and moon in our bodily system, which is very good for health. Level 1: Beginners to Intermediate Level 2: Intermediate to advanced

Ashtanga Yoga

Ashtanga

Ashtanga (Vinyasa) Yoga is a dynamic and physically challenging sequence, integrating breath and movement. It can help to improve the endurance, flexibility, strength and is a great calorie burning workout as well as mental focus. All in one class. The whole practice is done by flowing continuously, which is also the traditional roots of the modern Flow style. Ashtanga Primary Series (1 hr 15 min) This asana practice comprises the classical form of Vinyasa yoga as taught in its traditional sequence, called the Ashtanga Vinyasa Primary Series.  You’ll be guided through the practice in a manageable way to suit beginners. By following a structured sequence, students will learn to internalise physical aspects and thus develop mindfulness of their breath, prana (internal energy) and drishti (focused gaze). Ashtanga Basics (1 hr) This class is also suitable for Beginners who wants to learn the Ashtanga Style of Yoga practice. Slowly and progressively, students will be taught the poses in the Ashtanga Primary Series, which helps to increase flexibility, endurance and balance.

Flow Yoga

Flow

A fun way to energise yourself with dynamic flow sequence, which incorporates yoga postures and sun salutations to break a sweat! Multi-level class.

meditation Yoga

Meditation

Meditation can improve your life. It can reduce stress, prevents anxiety and balances your hormonal system. It may be difficult at first, but when you overcome the difficulties, bliss and joy comes.

Package Options

Pricing for Yoga Classes in Singapore. No sign up fees.

Starter Package

$ 17
(per class)
  • 10 Classes at $170
  • Valid for 10 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Popular Package

$ 15
(per class)
  • 20 Classes at $300
  • Valid for 20 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Wow Package

$ 14
(per class)
  • 30 Classes at $420
  • Valid for 30 weeks (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

Loyalty Package

$ 13
(per class)
  • 50 Classes at $650
  • Valid for 1 year (from date of purchase)
  • Flexible timing and choice of any classes
  • Online booking
  • Instant confirmation
  • Free cancellation of booking (at least 1 hr in advance)
  • Extension of validity date allowed with extension fees

We believe in quality

Tirisula team of dedicated Master Trainers and we have a pool of over 20 Yoga teachers

Master Paalu

Master Paalu

Yoga Master Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Simple actions, huge impact

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Satya Chong Wei Ling

Yoga & Pilates Teacher Trainer, Reiki Master & Sound Healer

Unfold the truth, break all barriers

Max Sree

Max Sree

Yoga Master Trainer

Beyond religion and beliefs

Andrea McKenna

Andrea McKenna

Prenatal and Children's Yoga Trainer, Sound Healer

Fun all around

Yoga Articles

Our Tirisula Yoga collection of Yoga articles from Yoga teachers, students from all over the world. Read about Yoga poses, chakras, meditation, anatomy, injuries prevention and much more

External to Internal, Internal to External

“ACTIVATE YOUR PSOAS” is probably one of the most commonly heard phrase for any student taking YTT. 

The Psoas muscle is probably one of the most important muscle in your body. It is a combination of two large muscles: the psoas major and the iliacus. They attach from the 12th thoracic vertebrae to the 5th lumbar vertebrae, through the pelvis , and to the inside of the proximal femur bone. This muscle is responsible for plenty of day-to-day activities, including stabilising the trunk and spine during movement and sitting. It is also connected to the breath due to its connection to the diaphragm. When startled or stressed, the psoas contracts as well.

In yoga, the psoas plays an important role in all the asanas. For instance, contracting the psoas bends the trunk forward in Paschimotanasana, or draws the knee up in Utthita Hasta Padangusthasana. Contracting the psoas on one side flexes the trunk, allowing for Utthita Trikonasana. Stretching the psoas allows for backbends such as Ustrasana. A toned psoas is also required for all inversions and arm balances. 

Outside of yoga however, we do not hear much of this muscle. What is focused on in most workouts or physical exercises target superficial muscles such as sculpting the ideal 6pac abdominals, training for bulging biceps and achieving firm glutes. 

In society, plenty of emphasis is placed on outward appearances. The clothes you wear and how well groomed you are affects the way other people perceive you. Looking the part can help you get ahead in job interviews. A physically attractive person can easily impress others. The endless bombardment of advertisements promoting unattainable beauty standards also has a large part to play. Look good, feel good — Looking good can help build your self esteem. Or so they say. This “self-esteem” or self image, however, is built on what other people think of you. External means are used to fulfil internal satisfaction. 

Back to the psoas muscles — An imbalance in the muscle can cause various problems such as pain in the lower back and hips when lifting the legs. Back pain is common, and posture can be affected. Internal muscles are equally important, if not more important, than superficial muscles. 

Likewise, the inner self needs equal, if not more, nourishment. Clinical depression has surged by huge percentages in recent decades. Self help related sales have been on an increase year-on-year, with books on topics such as happiness and self-esteem topping the charts. People increasingly find that the mind and body are at odds with each other.

Yoga is an internal journey and is beyond anything I have mentioned above. Not only does it strive to achieve the union of mind and body, it also includes the soul. 

The 8 limbs of yoga (Ashtanga) include:

  1. Yamas – guidelines for social behaviour
  2. Niyamas – guidelines for inner discipline and responsibility 
  3. Asanas – physical practice of holding steady, continuous, comfortable poses
  4. Pranayama – practising the extension of breath
  5. Pratyahara – removal of mind from sense organs
  6. Dharana – concentration
  7. Dhyana – meditation
  8. Samadhi – transcendence

It is unknown whether or not samadhi is ever achievable in this lifetime. Having that as a goal and through the practice of yoga however, allows for an internal transformation starting from physical, to mental, to spiritual. What is shown on the outside / the external as a by-product then ceases to matter.

Internal to external. Selfishness to selflessness. Inward focus to outward focus. 

Emotional Release Through Yoga

“Go deeper, go deeper, go deeper.”

I laid down on my back in Savasana after what felt like a very intense and fulfilling yoga session. It was only the third day of YTT, and my body was not yet used to the physical demands of all the conditioning we did. Nonetheless, the workout felt good. Finally, relaxation. Melting the body into the mat, feeling the perspiration slowly dry under the cool air from the air conditioning, the meditative voice of our teacher – it all felt calming. But the moment my body started to fully settle and cool down, I felt a sudden tightness in the body and tears started rolling out the corner of my eyes. Before I could make sense of what was happening, I was bawling.

As it turns out, it is fairly common for emotional releases to happen on the mat. So, what exactly was happening?

Focusing on the breath during meditation or savasana helps to calm the mind, taking away superficial stress and worry. But the silence and “going deeper” also forces us to access the feelings we bury and push aside on a daily basis. Emotional pain can feel overwhelming and crippling. The body hence comes to defense and does things to stop the pain from being fully experienced as a form of coping mechanism. There is thus a break between body and mind. However in yoga, the mind, body and spirit exists as one — or at least that’s the goal. The 3 are interconnected. The body keeps the score even if you’re not consciously thinking about it from day to day. It holds on to emotional tension, pain, trauma and intense joy. Through asanas, it wakes up the parts of the body that holds these emotions, helping to break through unresolved issues and energy.

Some say that hip-opening poses are good for helping to find release. It is not scientifically proven, but perhaps it can be  understood when relating to Chakras. The muladhara chakra is situated in the tailbone. The traits stored in this chakra includes security, self confidence, body image, and connection with nature. The swadishtana chakra, located in the sacrum, includes gender identity, anger, and sexual relations. The manipura chakra, located at the naval, includes belonging, trust, intimacy, friendship, status of your current position in life and whether it deviates from your true nature, and fear. It seems like  plenty of emotions are stored in these 3 chakras, all of which are situated near the hips. Perhaps they are stirred whenever sitting in a hip-opening pose. 

There are also sources that speak of the benefits of chest openers in relation to emotional release. This could be due to the increased flow of Prana (life force) which is situated in the anahada chakra (heart). Prana rides on the breath, which correlates to our respiratory system. According to the chinese, grief is stored in the lungs. Crying also involves gasping for air. 

However, I wonder how accurate these deductions are. If they are, could this be a potential way of identifying internal issues through physical tensions observed during asana postures? Or, could postures targeted at certain emotions be used in psychotherapy for healing?

PTSD and Yoga

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that develops after a person has experienced very stressful or distressing events. Symptoms can include intense feelings of distress and extreme physical reactions when reminded of the trauma, nightmares, detachment, feeling emotionally numb etc. 

In a normal person, stress levels usually return to normal after the stimulus is taken away. In people suffering from PTSD, however, the regulatory system that manages the stress hormones are malfunctioned. The smoke detector, the amygdala, is rewired by the trauma to interpret certain situations as life-threatening dangers. It sends signals to the survival brain to fight flee or freeze. Having all three happen the same time causes the person to mentally shut down, or trigger a panic attack.

There is a study recorded in the book “The Body Keeps the Score” by Bassel Van Der Kolk, where people who have experienced trauma had their Heart Rate Variability measured while in Savasana. Instead of picking up a clear signal, they ended up with too much muscle activity. Rather than going into relaxation, their muscles continue to “be on standby mode to fight unseen enemies”. It is shown how difficult it is for traumatised people to feel completely relaxed and physically safe in their bodies. Memory of helplessness is stored as muscle tension in the affected body areas. Many survivors cope by trying to “neutralise unwanted sensory experiences through self-numbing”. 

Yoga, however, can help. 

Learning to stay calm
People who have gone through trauma often find it difficult to stay calm. The body is constantly at a heightened state of anxiety and stress, especially for War Veterens. Through Pranayama, it teaches them to focus on the breath. More oxygen is brought to the head and the rest of the body which is known to help in relaxation. Kapalabathi (also a Kriya) for instance, helps with unlocking mental and emotional blockages. It encourages a tranquil state of mind, and can help relieve stress and depression. The chanting of AUM, which is the vibration of life, can also create a calming effect and help smoothen the mind. With regular practice, the focus on the breath and the internal chanting of AUM becomes habitual and can be a method to turn to whenever they sense a flashback or panic attack coming. 

Rebuilding body awareness
We need to be aware of what our body needs in order to take care of it. In yoga, there is focus on the breath and builds an understanding of how our body moves with it. We notice the connection between body and mind, emotions and physical asanas —  How anxiety about doing a pose ends up tensing the muscles and throwing you off balance. Or the calmness of hearing your own inhalations and exhalations during Ujjayi breathing. Physical practice of asanas can also help rebuild self-confidence and establish a friendly relationship with the body. This is especially so for survivors of sexual assault, many of whom hate their bodies. 

Learning to be in control
Trauma survivors often do not feel in control of their mind and body.  They may be able to logicize and think rationally on a normal basis. But when fear or strong emotions are triggered by association, all logic fails to work as the brain goes into survivor mode or shut down. These triggers are often random and can happen anytime. The fear of panic in itself can also increase the anxiety multifold. Yoga, however, teaches control. Through the lengthening of the breath in Pranayama, or learning to focus while in balancing poses, or holding in a pose for long periods of time, it all trains mental discipline and is reassuring that you still are in control. 

Channeling of energy
In yoga, there is practice of channeling energy towards energy centres such as the heart, throat, forehead etc during Asanas. Similarly, trauma survivors can also learn to channel their fear (negative) towards something more beneficial (positive). For example, determination to hold asanas, or the fight to keep trying and never give up when unable to do a pose. 

It is important for friends and family members to be supportive and help create a safe environment. Trauma survivors need to learn that the stressful situation is now over. They need to know that they are now safe and have no need for fear. This takes time to slowly rewire the brain, to relearn to trust. Patience and encouragement is key. Yoga can be helpful when introduced the practice slowly, but it is also important to understand that it can be very difficult for them to stay in Savasana or in any meditative state due to the sudden quietening of the mind which may bring up traumatic memories that they do not wish to relive. Symptoms for PTSD can last for months or years, or they may come and go in waves. However, with enough time, patience, willpower, and consistent yoga practice, the symptoms can be minimised, or even be eliminated.