Yoga or Pilates?

For many people , Yoga and Pilates look very similar – there are no power or cardio loads, exercises are performed slowly and consciously , with calm music. Pilates and yoga are wellness systems that include exercises to develop flexibility, endurance, and concentration. Regular exercises tidy up the body, allow you to find harmony with yourself. In this, both areas of fitness are similar.

But, having examined   these   practice closely, we  can find a lot of differences between them

    What is yoga?

     Yoga is the ancient Indian system of human self-development, which originated long before our era. This is a spiritual tradition, experience and wisdom of many generations that millions of people around the world have followed to this day.

Translated from Sanskrit, yoga means “union, communication, harmony.” Those. the unity of the physical and mental state of a person, the harmony of health and spiritual beauty. The purpose of classes is to achieve and maintain this unity.

It is impossible to imagine yoga without performing various asanas (static postures) that help improve the body. But physical practice is only part of the philosophy of yoga, one of the tools for working on consciousness. It also includes:

  • rules of personal and social behavior;
  • breathing exercises;
  • meditation
  • singing mantras;
  • body cleansing;
  • concentration of attention;
  • desire for complete control over the senses.

Therefore, yoga is a way of life aimed at achieving a balance of physical and psychological health, and not just a set of static exercises that develop flexibility and endurance.

What is pilates?

   Pilates is a system of healing the body, based on the dynamic performance of exercises that are performed in a specific technique and sequence. Their goal is to develop flexibility, improve the condition of joints and spine, posture and coordination of movements.

Pilates, unlike yoga, is a young trend in fitness. The German trainer Joseph Pilates developed gymnastic exercises for the rehabilitation of patients suffering from diseases of the musculature system at the beginning of the 20th century.

6 fundamental differences between Pilates and Yoga.

  • Yoga is the oldest system of self-development, philosophy, lifestyle. Pilates is a relatively young wellness system for the body, one of the types of fitness.
  • Pilates training is aimed at creating a healthy body, practicing yoga – at achieving harmony of the body, spirit and mind.
  • Many exercises and asanas are similar, but have a significant difference in technique. If in classical yoga you need to enter a pose and fix it for a long time (static load), then in Pilates the main thing is movement. All exercises are dynamic, repeated several times. Important consistent articulation of the spine and body muscles when entering and exiting the position.
  • Pilates breathing control helps to concentrate on doing the exercise and working muscles. Ancient practice provides breathing, as one of the steps to self-improvement (pranayama).
  • In Pilates, the muscles of the back and cortex are mainly worked out, in yoga – all muscle groups.
  • In classical hatha yoga additional equipment is not used. In Pilates classes  fitball, rings, rollers are actively used.

In my opinion, you should try both this practice and chose which is most suitable for you. However, if  you want to get a little more than just a beautiful and healthy body, then you may want choose yoga. After all, ancient practice is also aimed at working with the mind, includes methods of spiritual development and self-improvement. Practice will show what is right for you.

In Search of A Good Massage

We decided to move back to Australia after my daughter was born.  Since then, I have been looking forward to starting a new life in a foreign country.
As we settle down here, it eventually sits in me that this is not like Singapore where we can get almost anything and everything that we want easily and readily.  Shops close at 5pm here.  Eating out is expensive.  Services are expensive. So I had to learn to do everything by myself/ourselves, from housework to cooking to lawn mowing. It can be quite daunting especially for someone who has lived in a country (Singapore) where help is readily available and highly affordable.  I had to adapt.
It has been nice to be able to wake up to thin crisp fresh air every morning. I look forward to the season change. I look forward to the fresh produce.  I am happy here though at the back of my head, I wish I could get a good manicure/pedicure and most importantly, a good acupressure massage!  I missed those good massages that I used to indulge in to ease the body aches.
My back and neck aches from the housework and also the toll of carrying my 2-year-old daughter around.  After checking around for a good masseuse for sometime, I decided that it was not going to be an easy task.  I was disappointed in the nail treatments here, they are not as thorough as the manicurists in Singapore when it comes to cleaning the cuticles and they are certainly expensive.  After a couple times at the nail shops, I decided that DIY at home for me works well than paying to get it done.
I was thinking about my massage and I decided to Google for workout places when I had that spare time.  I chanced upon Pilates classes and there was this particular school, which had a Pilates Beginners class that was just about to start.  The timing of the class suits my schedule and I immediately signed up for the class.  Pilates has been something that I wanted to give it a go when I was in Singapore but hardly had the time to do it.
I was surprised to find that Pilates exercises are not as confronting as Yoga, which is good for someone like me, someone who hasn’t really exercise since I left school 2 decades ago.  The five weeks of beginners breezed through and I was happy with myself for doing it.
Pilates taught me the importance of breathing and core stabilization.  Something that can be easily overlooked.  It also shed light on the importance of having a strong core so that one can execute our exercises or day-to-day life’s tasks effectively without inflicting injuries on us.  It also taught me to be focus and discipline in what I do.
I started attending twice weekly classes and very soon, I found that I no longer suffered from neck and back aches.  Even the pain at the tailbone (which I started having after childbirth) was gone!  I am very impressed by what it does to my body.  When I am too busy to squeeze in an exercise session for the day, I will do quick warm ups with the hundreds, roll up and down, spine articulation exercises for 10 minutes before I start my day.  It works wonder.
It has been two and half years since I started my journey with Pilates.  Now whenever my friends asked if I want to go for massage whenever I am in Singapore, I will tell them I have a good masseuse already and he is Mr. Pilates!
 
Michelle, Mar 2015 Pilates Matwork Instructor Course, Tirisula Yoga

My Mother-In-Law

Every married women will very likely cringe whenever the term “mother-in-law” is brought up in any conversation.  I am one of those lucky ones to have a lovely mother-in-law who is very independent despite being sickly. She is 78 years old this year and was a nurse who did her nursing scholarship in UK.
After we moved back to Australia, it dawned on me that it is inevitable that we will have more frequent contacts/visits with my mother-in-law.  With every initial conversation pleasantries, my mother-in-law will usually continue to tell us about the pain that she is having on the back, neck, legs, cramps etc.  Everyday there will be some form of pain being brought up as we speak.  Some days, I avoided asking her how is she as I already anticipated what she would say.  I tried asking if she had been to physiotherapy, acupuncture, Pilates, etc. She will always have an answer ready for me.  It is like “she has been through and done that and that I am a step slower than her”.
Having said that, with her past experience as a nurse, she knows the importance of being diligent in physiotherapy and it is something that she does not missed.  Sadly physiotherapy alone could not help her much.  She tried acupuncture but the needles were too painful. She tried Pilates but the exercises were too tough for her and she couldn’t do them. She had consulted chiropractor on a few occasions but it did nothing to elevate her back and neck ache. She had an answer for almost anything that I suggested that she try.  She had surgeries done in her back and shoulder before and hence I can understand the intensity of the pain that she is feeling whenever it hits her.  Somehow none of the things that she tried or took to have done much to help her in her situation.  Though I can get “annoyed” with her whenever we are at this topic of her pain, deep down inside, I secretly wished I can have or help her find the right “antidote”.
Meanwhile, I started going for Pilates classes as part of my fitness regime. It had been something that I heard about but didn’t get the time to do when I was in Singapore.  My husband was surprised that I continued with my Pilates classes after I completed the beginner’s lessons.  He was even more surprised that I increased the number of classes that I go to every week and the fact that I was looking forward to going, surprises myself too.  I felt really good after each Pilates workout and the exercises are actually not difficult exercises. In fact, the exercises can be modified to suit each individual’s condition.  People noticed that I look different.  Even my mother-in-law!  She had her opinion on Pilates since it didn’t work for her.  I tried convincing her to give it another go as I have seen many elderly women attending the same Pilates class as me.  If they can do those exercises, I don’t see why my mother-in-law couldn’t.  She wasn’t keen, as she has tried Pilates before, so she said.
Lately, she started seeing a chiropractor again. She has been telling us how good this chiropractor is. She felt good these days after each chiro session with her.  I thought about what she said and asked her how different is this chiropractor from the previous one that she had seen. Her answer was the chiropractor’s hands were good and her suggested exercises were easy for my mother-in-law to do.  My mother-in-law even suggested that I go with her for her next appointment so that I can see for myself.
The day came and I accompanied her.  The chiropractor went about her ways to examine my mother-in-law. It was all routine until she asked my mother-in-law if she has been doing the few exercises that she had drawn up for her. My mother-in-law said she had not been doing them, as she has forgotten some of the exercises.  The chiropractor demonstrated the exercises again and told my mother-in-law that she needs to strengthen her core. Being kyphotic lordorsis, my mother-in-law encounters frequent neckaches.  Her protruding stomach is putting a strain on her back and she needs to build up her core muscles at the abdominal. Emphasis of the exercise regime for her is to focus on intercoastal breathing and using breathing to work on the respective muscles.  There and then, I felt enlightened and it struck me that the recommended exercises are all Pilates-related and how useful they are! After leaving the clinic, my mother-in-law was surprised when I told her that these are basic Pilates exercises.
Ever since that trip with my mother-in-law to the chiropractor, I have been thinking about how Pilates can improve one’s overall wellbeing not only for the immediate day to day but also for the future.  It is definitely a good hedge to have when we grow older.  That’s when I started my research on Pilates instructor course so as to learn more about Pilates.
Pilates is something I never regret picking up and is also definitely something that I will grow old with other, than with my beloved family….
 
Michelle, Mar 2015 Pilates Matwork Instructor Course, Tirisula Yoga

The 5 must-have’s to be a good Pilates instructor

shutterstock_119600044So you want to be a Pilates instructor? I do. That is why I am doing the 80hr program now. I am just half way through. For the little time that I have been trained as an instructor, there are a few things specific to Pilates that come to light.
1) You must love Grey’s Anatomy. Oops, I mean Gray’s Anatomy by Henry Gray (even though I do follow every episode of Grey’s Anatomy diligently). To be a good Pilates instructor, you have to know your anatomy like the back of your hands. Why? Pilates is all about precision and control. In order that you can be in total control, you really need to know your tool, which is body anatomy. So all those who didn’t pay much attention in Biology classes at school will need to brush up fast. All the bones and muscles and nerves can be a bit nerve wrecking initially. But it is the only way to really know how the puzzle comes together. To be honest, it can be quite fascinating. It came to a point that I was obsessed with it even though I hate to learn to spell in Latin.
2) You must be totally in touch with yourself. Contrology – the essence of Joseph Pilates’s method to Pilates training. It requires intense concentration and control of every part of your body. To do that, you need to be very well tuned in with your own body – full awareness and ability to engage certain muscles for particular exercises. Otherwise it would be very difficult for you to teach or help others when you don’t even know how it works for you.
3) You must be very ‘naggy’ in a positive way. There are 5 fundamental principles of Pilates training – breathing, pelvic, rib cage, scapula and cervical stabilization. They are usually deployed simultaneously in most of the exercises. Unless you are a master in multi-tasking, it is really not easy to apply. You will have to be like a kindergarten teacher who is constantly reminding the 3-yr-olds! eat your veggies, wash your hands, stay quiet, do your homework… In order to help the students, you will literally hear me repeating the same things over and over again throughout the practice. But it works and it is necessary. With that, it just brings me to the next point.
4) You must be a creative thinker with good imagination. In order not to sound like a broken record, you need to be creative with words. E.g. to remind the students to engage the transversus abdominis muscles (which is the deepest layer of the abdominal muscles), you can say — Suck your belly in, bring your navel to your spine, engage your powerhouse, activate your core… you got the idea. You may also want to think of some interesting choice of words like shine your chest to the front or melt your back to the mat. How about peel your shoulders off the mat or float your feet off the floor? I will spare you the details about what comes into my mind when I visualize these actions. But they certainly make the class a lot more interesting.
5) Last but not the least, you must be able to count!! The first and the basic Pilate exercise starts with the famous 100 – a hundred repetitions of the same move. Yes, 100 times! For someone like me — who can’t count and talk at the same time, it is quite a challenge. As for the rest of the regime, it is also about repetitions. While
you are busy observing your students and correcting them, you need to be able to count at the same time. It is definitely a good way to train your cognitive mind.
If the above doesn’t speak to you now, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you can’t be a good instructor. These behaviors can be developed over time. The key element above all, as with any profession or interest, is the passion. If you are passionate about Pilates, all will follow in due course.
Grace, Mar 2015 Pilates Matwork Instructor Course, Tirisula Yoga

Yoga or Pilates? To be or not to be? That is the question

I have been practicing Yoga for a long time and have been certified as a yoga instructor for 5 years. I am now getting my certification in Pilates training. So have I finally converted?
I am not going into the technical difference between these two disciplines. I am sure there has been a lot of research paper done on this topic already. Let me tell you what I think from a Pilates newbie’s point of view.
Pilates is often viewed as the cousin of Yoga. It deploys some similar moves as Yoga. That should not be too surprising since the founder of Pilates, Joseph Pilates, was a yoga devotee. But exactly how closely are these two cousins related?
Yoga has a spiritual element that is not present in Pilates. Pilates is more a physical training methodology. For example, when we look at the difference in breathing practice, Yoga use the breath to relax and focus the mind whereas Pilates uses the breath to fuel the muscles that you are working on. That being said, the requirement of totally awareness and concentration in Pilates (Contrology) can equally bring your mind into a meditative state which is one of the key Yoga principles to connect the body and the mind.
While the awareness of body movements in Pilates require practitioners to be more technical, proper alignment of the body is strongly emphasized in both disciplines for the practitioners to benefit fully from each of the poses (yoga) or exercises (Pilates) and to avoid potential injuries.
Yoga works on all parts of the body. Yoga poses are more all rounded varying from lying flat, sitting down to standing and total inversion. Regular practice will not only improve body strength but also flexibility. Pilates, however, primarily focuses on the ‘powerhouse’ (or the core) and most of the practice are done lying down or seated. Having said that, once your core is strengthened, the rest of the body benefits and becomes stronger and more flexible.
Yoga emphasizes ‘staying in the present’. Yoga practitioners usually feel more relaxed after their practice and carry this sense of ease with them because the mind is less clustered and can stay more focused. Pilates requires precision of each movement and total control of the body. As such, the coordination and the flow of the movements deem regular practitioners an air of grace in their daily life movements, just like ballerinas do.
All in all, it is not important how closely these two cousins are related. Even though the principles of the two schools are not exactly the same, both reap similar benefits and they do complement each other nicely.
So coming back to the fundamental question! have I converted? Well, if you put a gun to my head and make me choose, I would stay true to my yoga. Sorry but no disrespect here to my Pilates instructor. (Luckily, she is also a yoga master so I am sure she won’t be offended. However I do wonder what she would have to say?!)
Yoga has such a long history that makes Pilates looks like a newborn (Pilates was only formally established in the early twentieth century). The whole history of yoga development is naturally a lot more colorful and offers more cultural flavors. To be or not to be? It is a matter of personal preference (and/or how much more you like your yoga instructor over your Pilates instructor!!) My recommendation would be trying out both cousins and reap all the benefits that they have to offer.
Grace, Mar 2015 Pilates Matwork Instructor Course, Tirisula Yoga