From Mat Yoga to Rope Yoga, From Floor to Mid-Air, From Fear to No Fear

Kundalini Rajju Yoga

 

Today, I would like to do a small sharing on my yogic journey from the mat to rope….from the floor to  mid-air…..from fear to no fear ….it brings my yogic journey to a whole new level of breakthroughs and fun.

 

It was initially tough when we first started to learn rope yoga in January this year. We had to grab the rope in between the big toe and the second toe and pull ourselves up the rope with the strength from our legs and arms.

 

It was intense pain initially for all of us, as our feet were not conditioned to withstand such rough tension from the rope. We had to face pain in its raw state and dis-identify with pain. It took will persistence to show up at each session of training and to repeatedly attempt to climb the rope in spite of the pain.

 

Our toes get seasoned over a couple of weeks of regular rope yoga training sessions. Then we were able to advance into more asanas on the rope.  Doing asanas on the rope brings out different dimensions to our yoga practice.

 

Besides having to constantly dis-associate with pain, we now have to face our hidden fears.  In many areas of our life, we are often able to avoid our deep fear by choosing not to do things that frighten us. For example, if one is afraid of snakes, one just need to stay away from snakes.  However, when we are on the rope, we had to face our fears squarely.

 

We have experiences tremendous breakthroughs on the rope and the effects of the breakthroughs filter through all other aspects of our life….many of us also experience rapid progress in our mat yoga practice as a direct result of our exposure to rope yoga.

 

I would like to invite you to come and join us to experience the breakthroughs on rope yoga for yourself. You may contact me via watsapp at +65 9889 5654 or +65 9245 5656 to find out when and where we have our rope yoga sessions….

 

Looking forward to more fun and breakthroughs on my exciting journey of yoga….

 

Dorisq Tan

www.FB.com/YogicBodies

YogicBodies@gmail.com

+65 9889 5654

Dorisq Tan
Building Yogic Bodies, Vedic Minds

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Discussing “Pain” in the Singapore context [part 1]

DISCLAIMER:
This will be a pretty long anecdote/opinion piece so I have divided it into two parts for your benefit.

With longer working hours, the consequences of a sedentary lifestyle have been observed in the growing epidemic of chronic pain. Observe the working adults around you; you might see them involuntarily cracking their neck or unconsciously rubbing their shoulders in the hopes of temporarily relieving pain. Cases of chronic low back pain have also dramatically increased.

So why have we passively accepted and even accommodated this unwelcome presence of pain in our lives? From my own observations, pain (especially chronic pain) in Singapore has been perceived in the two extremes, however contradictory.

  1. Pain is a sign of hard work
  2. Pain is a sign of weakness

Let me explain myself. In Singapore, where most people are caught up in a rat race to be the best, the concept of “no pain, no gain” has become entrenched. It started off as an exercise motto that promises greater value rewards for the price of hard and even painful work but now it has been applied in all kinds of scenarios, including at our workplace and at school. In a way, that saying validates our competitiveness and justifies our long working hours. However, we have gone too far by glamorising that thinking. We have even begun to use pain to justify our hard work; for example, if you have muscle aches after a punishing workout, that is a good sign that you pushed yourself to the limit. If you have knots in your shoulders from working long hours on the computer, you are an excellent employee.

This is because we have been given the message that in order to succeed, we need punishing workouts, we need to work until we are completely exhausted, we need to work doubly hard to the next person. After all, pain is weakness leaving the body, right? No. In the short term, that might work, but it is damaging in the long run. It is not sustainable and the consequences have begun to show.

Speaking from personal experience, I have injured myself a few times because I subscribed to that belief. I was immersed in yoga for a few months and I feared that I would lose my hard-earned fitness if I took a day or two off. At the same time, I was balancing a time consuming part-time job and my first year of University. I was not getting enough sleep, not eating well enough and as a result, I was constantly exhausted. And in a flow class one day, I lost my focus for a moment and I hurt my wrist. For the next few months, I could not get myself into a proper chaturanga, plank poses and variations hurt greatly and I was forced to stop.

-> read part 2 for my revelations.