How Yogis System Implement in my daily life

After taking 200 YTT course in Tirisula, I think of the yogis system main goals is:

  • Physical Health
  • Mental Health
  • Spiritual Health
  • Self-Realisation or realisation of the Divine within us

Above all of these goals are attained by:

  • Love and help for all living beings
  • Respect for life
  • A peaceful state of mind
  • Full vegetarian diet
  • Pure thoughts and positive lifestyle
  • Physical, mental and spiritual practices

Regards to the above objectives, I have yoga experience in the past and think that physical health is the most important thing. Therefore, I have strictly set the schedule for yoga asana practices in my daily activities schedule. For me, there is nothing can affect my schedule. Practices on a certain schedule can give us a physical health, then only we can talk about mental and spiritual health. Before the teacher training course, reading is a way of giving me mental and spiritual nutrients, but after this course, I think I will begin to implement meditation as the foundation for the beginning of the day to maintain spiritual purity and peaceful. Finally, I have to admit that it is more difficult to implement full vegan diet in my life now, but slowly reducing the intake of meat is the way I can do from now and strive to be a vegan. Lastly, I hope that I can fully implement yogis system in my life.

 

 

 

Yoga and I

Yoga is amazing and it always inspires me. Every time I hit rock bottom and confuse about my life ahead, yoga always bring me back on track.

My life had been smooth and easy until six years ago. I graduated with a poor high school score despite I had done my best. As a result, I could not successfully enter to the university and faculty that I wanted. That was my first experience of failure. I was feeling down and shut myself away in my room during that time. I was really afraid to face the reality and the messy situation.

It was then I knew yoga. I was brought to yoga class by my sister. Gradually, I started to like this sport. At that time, I only treated yoga as a sport.

 

After a while, I finally found my life direction and went to the University of Taiwan to study Chinese. In Taiwan while I was pursuing my degree, I was attending yoga classes. Slowly I began to discover that after every yoga class, my heart always feels calm and stable. Most of the time I felt very happy and satisfied.

After graduated from university, I started my job in Malaysia. Without any previous working experience, I could not perform well in my job and I was under pressure. I felt I was a failure and very depressed at that time.

Until I returned to yoga, once again, yoga brought me back to the right track. I began to think more deeply about yoga, and realized a very important truth. When my breathing is right, everything will be right.

Thanks Yoga for entering my life and I am sure our story will be continued.

3 ways for beginner to start implementing yoga in daily routine

Firstly, I really understand the struggle of the beginners getting yoga into their life. It is challenging to schedule yoga practice in our daily routine while having a full time job. How to maintain daily yoga practice is always the question my friends put to me. I figure out the 3 methods I use to make daily yoga sustainable:

  • Sign up with a yoga studio which is next to YOU

When I started yoga, I knew that there were many yoga studio to choose from, but because i am packed of my work, so that I chose the yoga studio which is the closest from my company. After working, short distance from work place, changed to yoga clothes. You can directly go to the studio and start yours yoga practice. Believe me, it is really saves a lot of time and effort.

 

  • Fix your yoga schedule

After fixing the time, it must be strictly enforced. I barely changed the time that I fixed on my practice. Your practice continuously, it can bring you the effect that you wanted. Yoga is definitely worth your insistence in yours life!

 

  • Find a Yoga teacher you like in your studio

Your favourite teacher can be your positive motivation. No matter what reason you like the teacher, I believe that the energy generated by your favourite teacher can influence you more. You will become willing and more proactive. Just like my favourite teacher.

How to include yoga in our daily routine – Part 2

In my previous post, I have talked about 3 ways that requires minimal physical effort or time to implement yoga in my daily life. Now, let’s talk about the physical part, which requires a little more time.
If possible, wake up half an hour to an hour earlier. On days that I only manage to wake up half an hour earlier, can do some simple breathing exercise and stretches to clear the mind and wake up the digestive system.
1. 20x 3 sets of Kapalahbathi breathing
2. Anuloma Villoma (10 times)
3. Uddiyana Bandha (5 times)
4. Paschimottanasana (1 min)
5. Bhujangasana (1 min)
6. Ardha Matsyendrasana (1 min)
7. Show gratitude
If time permits, can add in 6 rounds of sun salutations and a headstand. Finally, end off with relaxation and a simple prayer.
If all else fails, at least do a 3 min headstand daily. This does not take a lot of time and would be more sustainable.

Gratitude

I have always wanted to attend a YTT course and am very grateful to be able to make it for this intensive course. There will always not be a right time and I am glad that I finally decided to take the plunge and just do it! Very grateful for those around me that made this happen.
Grateful for my supportive spouse. The constant support that he gives, be it taking care of the kids while allowing me to sleep late/ study on weekends, bringing dinner for me while I study at home, taking videos or photos, chipping in for household chores, etc.
Grateful for my in laws who helped to look after my kids since it’s school holiday, preparing dinner for us daily and even helping me to bind my course notes.
Grateful for my boss for allowing me to take a one month no pay leave to fully focus on this course. For my colleagues, who needed to do extra work, covering my work load while I’m away. For the company, which is so understanding and supporting my decision to take this course.
Grateful for my teachers, for sharing their knowledge, experience, wisdom. For their dedication and commitment to ensure we learn and absorb as much as possible.
Grateful for having a group of caring and supportive course mates. It is such a privilege and joy to be learning with this group of people.
Grateful for my healthy mind and physical body. To be able to go through the vigorous daily strength training, ability to immerse in the numerous topics that we discussed and talked about and basically just enjoy the entire process.
I am truly blessed and contented.

Headstand – King of Asanas!

It’s a love hate relationship when it comes to headstand! Before this, I always thought that headstand is just another fancy BEGINNER’s pose. To my horror, I was so wrong. To be honest, it is not that unachiveable but at the same time it is not as easy as it seems to be.
The benefits of headstand turns out not to be just an instagrammable photo but has a lot more awesome benefits to it. As it activates our pituitary gland, it further regulate other glands like thyroid, adrenal,etc. Through the journey of learning headstand, the numerous falls is nothing to shout about, compared to the patience, strength, concentration and perseverance that I gained.
We emerged to be stronger both mentally and physically and most importantly experienced the generosity of my course mates sharing tips, guidance and spending time to guide those that are still struggling with the pose.
At the time of writing, I still have not perfected my headstand but I know I’m getting close! Fighting 💪🏻

Yogic Principles in Daily Life – Part 2

Years ago a yoga teacher once told me that “Yoga without the breath is just a circus act”. This really resonated with me at the time and solidified early on in my practice, how integral the breath is when practicing yoga.

During my TTC I learnt that not only is yoga without the breath a circus act, but yoga without following the yogic principles is a circus act too. It’s not just all about the asanas, to be a true yogi you must abide by certain code of conduct. There are 8 limbs of Ashtanga yoga, the first of the Yamas (qualities in which a yogi should have) is Ahimsa, or non-violence.

Non-violence towards others in the most obvious way means not to physically harm or injure others, but as well as that maintaining an attitude that does not harm others also. If you can do Tittibhasana and Sirsasana perfectly but then go out into the world belittling others, you become part of the circus act.

Ahimsa means no cruelty towards animals. This aspect of the Yamas is why a large portion of yogis are vegetarians and vegans. In regards to animals, Sree taught us that ahimsa also means not keeping fish in small tanks or birds in cages. In those cases we are trapping the animal just for our viewing pleasure, and thus it is of a violent nature.

I am already a vegetarian so can fully understand this aspect of ahimsa. The biggest aspect of ahimsa that I will integrate into my daily life, is the violence towards myself. Just as I wouldn’t go out into the world and speak negatively to other people, I mustn’t do the same to myself. I definitely notice in my yoga practice if I cannot do a pose I will speak negatively towards myself, but am aiming to culture a more positive attitude and integrate ahimsa towards myself into my daily life.

And I have to admit that having a few injuries along the way has really helped me to practice ahimsa towards myself!

Yoga practitioner must be a vegetarian?

After practicing yoga for quite some time and learning yoga philosophy many thoughts about vegetarianism are hitting my head. Especially I am concerned even more because I eat meat regularly and quite like the taste.

 

I heard from someone that if you are a vegetarian your body gets more optimized for yoga practice.

 

But why do we have to be a vegetarian?

If the determination to become a vegetarian is because many yoga practitioners do so then it wouldn’t be lasting long.

 

But then why yoga practitioners don’t eat meat?

I figured out 2 of the reasons.

 

  1. Karma

It says if we eat meat then all the negative feelings before animal dies would be absorbed to our body. Therefore they don’t eat meat because it distracts the energy for breathing and Asana.

 

  1. Ahimsa

Ahimsa means non violence and no destruction of life.

It’s one of the philosophy that yoga practitioner should follow. It can’t be even imagined how big violence eating meat is to animals.

You could say that I didn’t cause the direct violence to animals but they were killed to be eaten for human, meat eater could be a ground for the violence.

 

But the reason yoga people are vegetarian is not only for the body.

Vegetarianism is just one of the things that we follow the philosophy of yoga.

The more important things than being a vegetarian are that all the things such as spirits, thoughts, action, sympathy and etc. that we do in our daily life.

If you are a vegetarian who don’t feel the love of animals inside you then it’s just not real.

 

Before writing this post I have thought of my diets and usual thoughts.

And questioned myself if I feel sympathy consistently in my life and am able to become a sincere vegetarian that I want from a deep bottom of my heart?

 

To be honest the answer is not yet.

But as a person who loves yoga, I will try to implement things yoga pursues to my life step by step. I think it might be a good idea to take a moment and think about animals when I eat meat.

 

But if you want to grow physically and spiritually through yoga, and something from your heart whispers then you can simply start vegetarianism now!

Running and Yoga

A few months ago I signed up for my first ever half marathon. Practicing yoga really helps me to run stronger and recover faster. It keeps me running balanced with a strong core and a nice steady cadence. So many people talk about how amazing running is when its combined with yoga, however running is not the best physical activity for my yoga practice.

After running, my quads, hamstrings and ITB all tighten up and make it difficult for me to lengthen out, especially in some of my favourite poses like Adho Mukha Svasana and Paschimottanasana. It surprised me just how much of a drastic difference it made in my asanas the day after a run compared to having not run at all.

After guidance from Sree during my TTC, I now leave my yoga practice for directly after a run. This helps lengthen my muscles out again and also loosens them off so they’re not as tight. What I’ve personally found to be very helpful is by starting with 3x rounds of Surya Namaskar, at a nice slow pace holding each asana for 5 breaths, to really get a nice deep stretch. I then follow this with 3x rounds of Surya Namaskara A and Surya Namaskara B. I follow this with all of the standing postures in the ashtanga primary series, Paschimottanasana, Purvottanasana, Janu Sirsasana and a few core exercises before I go into Sarvangasana, Halasana & Karanapidasana.

I find that all of the standing postures in the primary series are perfect for lengthening out those target muscles that all become tightened whilst running. 45 minutes – 1 hour of yoga straight after a run really makes all the difference!

Yogic Principles in Daily Life Part 1

By doing the 200hr TTC, it has taught me that I need to properly warm up the body and the mind each morning. It is important to do the following activities after rising, on an empty stomach.

In the morning the yogi can start with 3x rounds of 20x pumps of Kapalahbathi, this is to clear the sinus cavities and nasal passageway. It also purifies the nadis and energises the mind whilst removing sleepiness.

This is followed by Anuloma Villoma which helps to balance the nadis. Anuloma Villoma is done in Sukhasana, easy pose, with the left hand in Jana Mudra and the right hand in Vishnu Mudra. In the morning we start with the first inhalation on the right nostril, then after retaining the breath, hold the right nostril and open the left nostril exhaling slowly. Then inhale left nostril, hold, open right nostril and exhale slowly. Continue for 20x rounds on each nostril.

Following this we perform Uddiyana Bandha for 5 rounds. This is done to strengthen and tone the abdomen, internal organs and pelvic floor muscles. It stimulates the manipura chakra and soothes anxiety. Uddiyana Bandha has to be done on an empty stomach and avoided when menstruating.

This is then followed by a few asanas to gently warm up the physical body. Pachimottanasana, Bhujangasana and Ardha Matsyendrasana should each be held for 1 minute.

The final part of the morning routine is to meditate on what we are grateful for in our lives. Cultivating gratitude is a practice which elevates our individual consciousness.

This is a part of yogic practice which is now already integrated into my daily routine and will continue to be after the TTC has finished.