Yoga and detox

In the past, when hearing the word “detox” the first things that come
to my mind are juice diets and yoga. When the concept of detox was
first getting popular I had dismissed it as a clever way for people to
give value or benefits to something that originally had none. From my
understanding of it, detoxification is a very difficult thing to
quantify. After a week of drinking celery juice did how much cleaner
can your liver become? After a month of sweating in yoga how much
purification can your spleen go through? It was only recently did I
find the real value in the concept detox.
While I’m sure there are plenty detoxifying effects your body can go
through, and many benefits you can experience from the process of
detoxification, I find much more interest in the detox your mind and
your soul goes through while being exposed to yoga.
Yoga as a philosophy is one that teaches us to lead a purer lifestyle.
Purity in the choices we make and the habits we form, purity in body
through asana practice, purity in mind through disconnecting ourselves
from the inessential noise and trivialities in life, and purity in our
soul through living a non violent non karma forming lifestyle.
In the past I wouldn’t have ever asked myself how pure my mind and
soul were, and if I did I don’t think I would have known how to answer
that question. Now that I’ve learned a little bit about the yogic
philosophy and the have an understanding about what the toxicity
can mean, I think it’s possible now to start seriously assessing this
question.
Now when I think about detox something else comes to mind; that is,
the degree to which something involves something else. For example
whether or not during my asana practice my emotions or ego are
interfering with the dristi or breathing. Or during a kind action
whether or not a selfish reason is involved in making that action.
My hope is that through being conscious of detoxification
that every aspect of my life can become more pure.