Connecting the dots

Growing up in India, I was introduced to yoga pretty early on in life, or rather to elements of yoga. Some yoga exercises were taught at school, some learnt watching my grandfather’s practice. When I was about 14 years old, I attended a 4 day Vipassana camp for students organized by the school, which was my introduction to meditation. I experimented with it from time to time. Even if just to fall asleep. It was common to hear conversations around the concepts of gunas, chakras and other yoga philosophy, although usually associated with older, retired people. ‘Namaste’ was just a greeting we uttered as many times a day as the English speaking world says ‘Hello’. All this wasn’t exotic or mystical; it was just a way of life.

Over time, I have attended several yoga classes and types, some hot & sweaty, some slow & sleepy and others with more creative names. I have also attempted following a regular Dhyana practice.  When I was younger, yoga was exercise. During and after my pregnancy, yoga helped me build flexibility and strength. When I was grieving, Yoga & meditation were the light that pulled me through.

However, it was during my time at Tirisula and specially during the discussions every afternoon with the Masters that I realized that this piecemeal approach towards yoga or occasional yoga isn’t really yoga. To experience it truly in its entirety, I need to practice it everyday. Not just the asanas or just the meditation; and not just to fix what doesn’t seem right, but everyday, all the time. We spoke in class about practical applications of the ancient Yoga philosophy & principles in current day and age and in our daily lives. Some of the principles aren’t as easy to follow as they seem, but then Yoga is a personal journey. It isn’t a time bound race to a specific destination.

The teachings and opportunities have been around me all my life, but it was only during my time here and during the several conversations and thoughts seeded through these conversations, that I could finally see the dots connecting.

Prapti (Yoga TTC200hr, January 2016)